AVIATION / FAA “Airworthiness Directives” to correct “unsafe conditions” in aircraft and engines – Boeing, Cessna, C.F.M. International, Eurocopter, GROBWerk, Lycoming, PILATUS, and “Various Aircraft Equipped with Wing Lift Struts.

 

The FAA has issued various final or proposed “airworthiness directives” (“AD’s”) for specified models of aircraft and engines.

Who is affected? Any party who operates or holds a property interest (owner, lessee, or security party) in the specified aircraft or engines.

What is an AD? Per 14 CFR § 39.1 the FAA issues an AD where: (a) “An unsafe condition exists in a product [aircraft, engine, propeller, or appliance]; and (b) “that condition is likely to exist or develop in other products of the same type design”. “No person may operate a product to which an [AD] applies except in accordance with the requirements of that [AD].” 14 CFR § 39.3. 

Certain Boeing Company Model 747-100, 747-100B, 747-100B SUD, 747-200B, 747-200C, 747-200F, 747-300, 747-400, 747-400D, 747-400F, 747SR, and 747SP series airplanes; and certain Model 757-200, -200PF, and -300 series airplanes. 

January 18, 2013, Final rule

The FAA is superseding an existing airworthiness directive (AD) for certain The Boeing Company Model 747-100, 747-100B, 747-100B SUD, 747-200B, 747-200C, 747-200F, 747-300, 747-400, 747-400D, 747-400F, 747SR, and 747SP series airplanes; and certain Model 757-200, -200PF, and -300 series airplanes. That AD currently requires replacing the control switches of the forward, aft, and nose cargo doors of Model 747 airplanes; and requires replacing the control switches of cargo doors 1 and 2 of Model 757 series airplanes. This new AD adds airplanes to the applicability and revises the initial compliance times for those airplanes. This AD was prompted by reports of problems associated with the uncommanded operation of cargo doors. The FAA is issuing this AD to prevent injuries to persons and damage to the airplane and equipment. 

Certain Boeing Company Model 747-100, 747-200B, 747-200C, 747-200F, 747-300, 747-400, 747-400F, and 747SR series airplanes.

January 18, 2013, Final rule.

The FAA is adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain The Boeing Company Model 747-100, 747-200B, 747-200C, 747-200F, 747-300, 747-400, 747-400F, and 747SR series airplanes. This AD was prompted by reports of broken and damaged latch pin retention bolts and subsequent migration of the latch pins of the main deck side cargo door (MDSCD). This AD requires various repetitive inspections of the MDSCD latch pin fittings, measuring the latch pin, and related investigative and corrective actions if necessary. This AD also requires modifying the latch pin fittings and installing new latch pins and latch pin fasteners. The FAA is issuing this AD to prevent loss of the cargo door and rapid depressurization of the airplane.

Certain Boeing Company Model 757-200, -200PF, and -200CB series airplanes powered by Rolls-Royce engines. 

January 18, 2013, Final rule.

The FAA is superseding an existing airworthiness directive (AD) for certain The Boeing Company Model 757-200, -200PF, and -200CB series airplanes powered by Rolls-Royce engines. That AD currently requires repetitive inspections of the shim installation between the drag brace fitting vertical flange and bulkhead, and repair if necessary; for certain airplanes, an inspection for cracking of the four critical fastener holes in the horizontal flange, and repair if necessary; and, for airplanes without conclusive records of previous inspections, performing the existing actions. This new AD reduces the repetitive inspection interval; adds repetitive detailed inspections for cracking of the bulkhead, and repair if necessary; allows an extension of the repetitive intervals for certain airplanes by also doing repetitive ultrasonic inspections for cracking of the bulkhead, and repair if necessary; and provides an option for a high frequency eddy current inspection for cracking of the critical fastener holes, and repair if necessary. This action also adds a terminating action for certain repetitive inspections. This AD was prompted by reports of loose fasteners and cracks at the joint common to the aft torque bulkhead and strut-to-diagonal brace fitting, and one report of such damage occurring less than 3,000 flight cycles after the last inspection. The FAA is issuing this AD to detect and correct cracks, loose and broken bolts, and shim migration in the joint between the aft torque bulkhead and the strut-to-diagonal brace fitting, which could result in damage to the strut and consequent separation of the strut and engine from the airplane.

Certain Boeing Company Model 737-300, 737-400, 737-500, and 757-200 series airplanes. 

January 18, 2013, Final rule.

The FAA is adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain The Boeing Company Model 737-300, 737-400, 737-500, and 757-200 series airplanes. This AD was prompted by a report of damage caused by electrical arcing to the wires that connect seat electronics boxes (SEBs). This AD requires installing a new relay and doing certain wiring changes of the entertainment control switch. The FAA is issuing this AD to prevent power from being supplied to passenger seats when the entertainment control switch is in the OFF position, which could cause an electrical shock hazard resulting in serious or fatal injury to maintenance personnel.

Certain Boeing Company Airplanes Model 737-100, -200, -200C, -300, -400, -500, -600, -700, -700C, -800, and -900 series airplanes. 

January 16, 2013, Notice of Proposed Rulemaking.

The FAA proposes to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Boeing Company Airplanes Model 737-100, -200, -200C, -300, -400, -500, -600, -700, -700C, -800, and -900 series airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by a report that the seat track attachment of body station 520 flexible joint is structurally deficient in resisting a 9g forward emergency load condition in certain seating configurations. This proposed AD would require replacing the pivot link assembly on certain seats, and modifying or replacing the seat track link assemblies on certain seats. Also, for certain airplanes, this proposed AD would require installing a new seat track link assembly. The FAA is proposing this AD to prevent seat detachment in an emergency landing, which could cause injury to occupants of the passenger compartment and affect emergency egress.

Certain The Boeing Company Model 747-200B, 747-300, 747-400, 747-400D, 747-400F series airplanes, and Model 767 series airplanes, powered by General Electric (GE) CF6-80C2 engines. 

January 16, 2013, Notice of Proposed Rulemaking.

The FAA proposes to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain The Boeing Company Model 747-200B, 747-300, 747-400, 747-400D, 747-400F series airplanes, and Model 767 series airplanes, powered by General Electric (GE) CF6-80C2 engines. This proposed AD was prompted by reports of failure of the electro-mechanical brake flex shaft (short flexshaft) of the thrust reverser actuation system (TRAS). This proposed AD would require replacing the short flexshaft on each engine with a new short flexshaft, testing of the electro-mechanical brake and center drive unit (CDU) cone brake to verify the holding torque, and performing related investigative and corrective actions if necessary. The FAA is proposing this AD to prevent an uncommanded in-flight thrust reverser deployment and consequent loss of control of the airplane. 

Certain Cessna Aircraft Company Models 172RG, R182, TR182, FR182, 210N, T210N, 210R, T210R, P210N, P210R, and T303 airplanes. 

January 18, 2013, Proposed Rule; Withdrawal 

By the document in the Federal Register linked here the FAA  withdraws a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) that would have applied to certain Cessna Aircraft Company Models 172RG, R182, TR182, FR182, 210N, T210N, 210R, T210R, P210N, P210R, and T303 airplanes. The proposed airworthiness directive (AD) would have required inspection of the aircraft’s hydraulic power pack wiring for incorrect installation, and if needed, correct the installation. Since issuance of the NPRM, the FAA has re-evaluated this airworthiness concern and determined that an unsafe condition does not exist that would warrant AD action. This withdrawal does not prevent the FAA from initiating future rulemaking on this subject. 

Certain CFM International, S. A. (CFM) model CFM56-5 and CFM56-5B series turbofan engines. 

January 14, 2013, Notice of Proposed Rulemaking. 

The FAA proposes to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain CFM International, S. A. (CFM) model CFM56-5 and CFM56-5B series turbofan engines. This proposed AD was prompted by corrosion of the delta P valve in the hydromechanical unit (HMU) caused by contaminants in type TS-1 fuel. This proposed AD would require cleaning, inspection and repair of affected HMUs. The FAA is proposing this AD to prevent seizure of the HMU, leading to failure of one or more engines and damage to the airplane. 

Eurocopter Deutschland GmbH (Eurocopter) Model MBB-BK 117 C-2 helicopters.

January 18, 2013, Final rule.

The FAA proposes to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for Eurocopter Deutschland GmbH (Eurocopter) Model MBB-BK 117 C-2 helicopters. This proposed AD would require determining if a certain serial-numbered bevel gear is installed in the tailrotor intermediate gear box (IGB). If such a bevel gear is installed in the IGB, this AD would require recording the bevel gear’s reduced life limit in the Airworthiness Limitations section of the maintenance manual and on the component history card or equivalent IGB record. If the bevel gear’s life limit has been reached or exceeded, this AD would require, before further flight, replacing the bevel gear with an airworthy bevel gear. This proposed AD is prompted by the discovery that the tooth foot fillets in certain bevel gears fell below the minimum dimensions required in the design documents to ensure safe functioning of the bevel gear until reaching its approved life limit. The proposed actions are intended to prevent failure of a bevel gear before reaching its currently approved life limit, failure of the IGB, and subsequent loss of helicopter control. 

GROB-WERKE Model G115EG airplanes. 

January 15, 2013, Notice of Proposed Rulemaking.

The FAA proposes to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for GROB-WERKE Model G115EG airplanes. This proposed AD results from mandatory continuing airworthiness information (MCAI) originated by an aviation authority of another country to identify and correct an unsafe condition on an aviation product. The MCAI describes the unsafe condition as cracks in the elevator trim tab arms on several Grob G 115 airplanes, which could result in failure of the part and consequent loss of control. The FAA is issuing this proposed AD to require actions to address the unsafe condition on these products. 

Lycoming Engines TSIO-540-AK1A, and Continental Motors, Inc. TSIO-360-MB, TSIO-360-SB, and TSIO-360-RB reciprocating engines, with certain Hartzell Engine Technologies (HET) turbochargers, model TA0411, part number 466642-0001; 466642-0002; 466642-0006; 466642-9001; 466642-9002; or 466642-9006, or with certain HET model TA0411 turbochargers overhauled or repaired since August 29, 2012. 

January 14, 2013, Final Rule; Correction. 

The FAA is correcting an airworthiness directive (AD) that published in the Federal Register. That AD applies to Lycoming Engines TSIO-540-AK1A, and Continental Motors, Inc. TSIO-360-MB, TSIO-360-SB, and TSIO-360-RB reciprocating engines, with certain Hartzell Engine Technologies (HET) turbochargers, model TA0411, part number 466642-0001; 466642-0002; 466642-0006; 466642-9001; 466642-9002; or 466642-9006, or with certain HET model TA0411 turbochargers overhauled or repaired since August 29, 2012. The Summary paragraph and the Applicability paragraph list an incorrect engine model for Lycoming Engines. The document in the Federal Register to which this is linked corrects those errors. In all other respects, the original document remains the same. 

PILATUS Aircraft Ltd. Model PC-7 airplanes. 

January 18, 2013, Final Rule; Request for Comments.

The FAA is adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for PILATUS Aircraft Ltd. Model PC-7 airplanes. This AD results from mandatory continuing airworthiness information (MCAI) issued by the aviation authority of another country to identify and correct an unsafe condition on an aviation product. The MCAI describes the unsafe condition as cracks in the engine mount fittings caused by stress corrosion. The FAA is issuing this AD to require actions to address the unsafe condition on these products. 

“Various Aircraft Equipped with Wing Lift Struts”. 

January 16, 2013, Notice of Proposed Rulemaking.

The FAA proposes to revise an existing airworthiness directive (AD) that applies to certain aircraft equipped with wing lift struts. The existing AD currently requires repetitively inspecting the wing lift struts for corrosion; repetitively inspecting the wing lift strut forks for cracks; replacing any corroded wing lift strut; replacing any cracked wing lift strut fork; and repetitively replacing the wing lift strut forks at a specified time for certain airplanes. The existing AD also currently requires incorporating a “NO STEP” placard on the wing lift strut. Since the FAA issued that AD, it was informed that paragraph (c) in the existing AD was being misinterpreted and causing confusion. This proposed AD would clarify the intent of the language currently in paragraph (c) of the existing AD and would retain all other requirements of the existing AD. The FAA is  proposing this AD to correct the unsafe condition on these products.