AVIATION / FAA “Airworthiness Directives” to correct “unsafe conditions” in aircraft and engines – Airbus airplanes, Bell helicopters, Boeing airplanes, Bombardier airplanes, Cessna Aircraft airplanes, DASSAULT SERVICES airplanes, DG Flugzeugbau GmbH engines, Embraer, S.A. airplanes, Eurocopter France helicopters, Gulfstream Aerospace airplanes, Hawker Beechcraft Corporation airplanes, Lindstrand Hot Air Balloons, Pacific Aerospace airplanes, Pilatus airplanes, Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. engines, Rolls-Royce Deutschland engines, and Schweizer Aircraft Corporation airplanes.

The FAA has issued various final or proposed “airworthiness directives” (“AD’s”) for specified models of aircraft and engines. 

Who is affected? Any party who operates or holds a property interest (owner, lessee, or security party) in the specified aircraft or engines.

What is an AD? Per 14 CFR § 39.1 the FAA issues an AD where: (a) “An unsafe condition exists in a product [aircraft, engine, propeller, or appliance]; and (b) “that condition is likely to exist or develop in other products of the same type design”. “No person may operate a product to which an [AD] applies except in accordance with the requirements of that [AD].” 14 CFR § 39.3. 

Certain Airbus Model A300 B4-600, B4-600R, and F4-600R series airplanes, and Model A300 C4-605R Variant F airplanes (collectively called A300-600 series airplanes); and Model A310 series airplanes. 

February 12, 2013, Final Rule. 

The FAA is adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all Airbus Model A300 B4-600, B4-600R, and F4-600R series airplanes, and Model A300 C4-605R Variant F airplanes (collectively called Model A300-600 series airplanes); and Airbus Model A310 series airplanes. This AD was prompted by fuel system reviews conducted by the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA). This AD requires modifying the electrical control circuits of the inner, center, and trim tank pumps, as applicable. The FAA is issuing this AD to reduce the potential of ignition sources inside fuel tanks, which, in combination with flammable fuel vapors, could result in fuel tank explosions and consequent loss of the airplane.

Bell Helicopter Textron (Bell) Model 212 helicopters and adopting requirements for Bell Model 204B, 205A, 205A-1, 205B and 210 helicopters with certain part-numbered main rotor hub inboard strap fittings (fittings). 

February 12, 2013, Final Rule; Request for Comments.

The FAA is superseding an existing airworthiness directive (AD) for the Bell Helicopter Textron (Bell) Model 212 helicopters and adopting requirements for Bell Model 204B, 205A, 205A-1, 205B and 210 helicopters with certain part-numbered main rotor hub inboard strap fittings (fittings). This AD requires magnetic particle inspecting (MPI) the fittings fora crack, and if a crack exists, replacing the fittings with airworthy fittings. This AD is prompted by reports of additional cracked fittings and the determination that additional part-numbered fittings may not have been manufactured in accordance with approved manufacturing processes and controls. These actions are intended to identify a crack in the fitting, which may lead to the fitting’s failure, loss of a main rotor blade, and subsequent loss of helicopter control.

Certain The Boeing Company Model 707 airplanes, and Model 720 and 720B series airplanes. 

February 14, 2013, Final Rule.

The FAA is superseding an existing airworthiness directive (AD) for certain The Boeing Company Model 707 airplanes, and Model 720 and 720B series airplanes. That AD currently requires replacing wiring for the fuel boost pumps and override pumps with new wiring, installing Teflon sleeving on the wiring, and doing associated actions; and doing repetitive inspections to detect damage of the wiring or evidence of a fuel leak. This new AD reduces the repetitive inspection interval. This AD was prompted by a determination that an inspection interval must be reduced. The FAA is issuing this AD to detect and correct damaged wiring for the fuel boost pumps and override pumps, which could cause electrical arcing that could puncture the conduit containing the wire, and result in a fuel tank explosion or a fire adjacent to the fuel tank. 

All The Boeing Company Model 757 airplanes. 

February 19, 2013, Final Rule.

The FAA is adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all The Boeing Company Model 757 airplanes. This AD was prompted by reports of fuel leaking from the front spar of the wing through the slat track housing. This AD requires a detailed inspection of the inboard and outboard main slat track downstop assemblies and a torque application to the main track downstop assembly nuts of slat numbers 1 through 10, excluding the outboard track of slats 1 and 10; a detailed inspection of all slat track housings for foreign object debris (FOD) and visible damage; and corrective actions if necessary. The FAA is issuing this AD to detect and correct incorrectly installed main slat track downstop assemblies, which, when the slat is retracted, could cause a puncture in the slat track housing and lead to a fuel leak and potential fire.

Certain Bombardier, Inc. Model CL-600-1A11 (CL-600), CL-600-2A12 (CL-601), and CL-600-2B16 (CL-601-3A, CL-601-3R, & CL-604 Variants) airplanes. 

February 12, 2013, Final Rule. 

The FAA is adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Bombardier, Inc. Model CL-600-1A11 (CL-600), CL-600-2A12 (CL-601), and CL-600-2B16 (CL-601-3A, CL-601-3R, & CL-604 Variants) airplanes. This AD was prompted by reports of cracking found on the upper and lower Web of the engine support beam. This AD requires revising the maintenance program. The FAA is issuing this AD to detect and correct fatigue cracking of the engine support beam, which could result in failure of the engine support beam and affect the structural integrity of the airplane.

Certain Cessna Aircraft Company Models 172R and 172S airplanes. 

February 12, 2013, Final Rule.

The FAA is adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Cessna Aircraft Company Models 172R and 172S airplanes. This AD was prompted by reports of chafing of a new configuration of the fuel return line assembly, which was caused by the fuel return line assembly rubbing against the right steering tube assembly during rudder pedal actuation. This AD requires you to install the forward and aft fuel return line support clamps and brackets; inspect for a minimum clearance between the fuel return line assembly and the steering tube assembly and clearance between the fuel return line assembly and the airplane structure; and, if any damage is found, replace the fuel return line assembly. The FAA is issuing this AD to correct the unsafe condition on these products. 

All Dassault Aviation Model Mystere-Falcon 50 airplanes.

February 12, 2013, Final Rule. 

The FAA is adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all Dassault Aviation Model Mystere-Falcon 50 airplanes. This AD was prompted by a manufacturer revision to the airplane maintenance manual (AMM) that introduces new or more restrictive maintenance requirements and airworthiness limitations. This AD requires revising the maintenance program to incorporate new or revised maintenance requirements and airworthiness limitations. The FAA is issuing this AD to prevent reduced structural integrity of the airplane.

DG Flugzeugbau GmbH Model DG-1000T gliders equipped with Solo Kleinmotoren Model 2350 C engines. 

February 12, 2013, Final Rule.

The FAA is adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for DG Flugzeugbau GmbH Model DG-1000T gliders equipped with Solo Kleinmotoren Model 2350 C engines. This AD results from mandatory continuing airworthiness information (MCAI) issued by an aviation authority of another country to identify and correct an unsafe condition on an aviation product. The MCAI describes the unsafe condition as a material defect of the propeller shaft, most likely caused by a manufacturing error. The FAA is issuing this AD to require actions to address the unsafe condition on these products.

Certain Embraer S.A. Model ERJ 170 and ERJ 190 airplanes.  

February 12, 2013, Final Rule.

The FAA is adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Embraer S.A. Model ERJ 170 and ERJ 190 airplanes. This AD was prompted by reports of the cockpit door falling off the hinges when it is being opened or closed. This AD requires replacing the striker and quick-release pin of the passive lock of the cockpit door, and replacing the upper and lower hinges of the cockpit door. The FAA is issuing this AD to prevent the cockpit door from falling off the hinges, which could cause injury to airplane occupants.

Eurocopter France (Eurocopter) Model EC 155B, EC155B1, SA-365N1, AS-365N2 and AS 365 N3 helicopters.

February 12, 2013, Final Rule; Request for Comments.

The FAA is superseding an existing airworthiness directive (AD) for Eurocopter France (Eurocopter) Model EC 155B, EC155B1, SA-365N1, AS-365N2 and AS 365 N3 helicopters. That AD currently requires inspecting certain tail rotor hubs (TRH) for a crack and removing any cracked TRH. This AD requires the same actions but adds more part numbers to the list of affected TRHs. This AD is prompted by further analysis that indicates that additional part-numbered TRHs must be inspected for cracks. The actions specified by this AD are intended to detect a crack in the TRH and prevent the tail rotor from jamming, which could lead to reduced or loss of control of the helicopter.

All Gulfstream Aerospace LP (Type Certificate Previously Held by Israel Aircraft Industries, Ltd.) Model Gulfstream G150 airplanes. 

February 19, 2013, Final Rule.

The FAA is adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all Gulfstream Aerospace LP (Type Certificate Previously Held by Israel Aircraft Industries, Ltd.) Model Gulfstream G150 airplanes. This AD was prompted by a review that determined that the runway slope and anti-ice corrections to V 1 and take-off distances in the Gulfstream G150 Airplane Flight Manual (AFM) were presented in a non-conservative manner. This AD requires revising the performance section of the AFM to include procedures to advise the flightcrew of certain runway slope and anti-ice corrections and take-off distance values. The FAA is issuing this AD to prevent the use of published non-conservative data, which could result in the inability to meet the required take-off performance, with consequent hazard to safe operation during performance-limited take-off operations.

Certain Hawker Beechcraft Corporation (Type Certificate previously held by Raytheon Aircraft Company; Beech Aircraft Corporation) Model 400A airplanes. 

February 12, 2013, Final Rule.

The FAA is adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Hawker Beechcraft Corporation (Type Certificate previously held by Raytheon Aircraft Company; Beech Aircraft Corporation) Model 400A airplanes. This AD was prompted by a report that the wiring for the 5-volt direct current (DC) system is undersized and does not have adequate circuit protection for the smaller gauge wire. This AD requires installing an in-line fuse in the 5-volt DC system for each of the five instrument lighting control power supplies. The FAA is issuing this AD to prevent failure of the wiring, which could result in smoke in the cockpit, loss of cockpit lighting, and potential damage to surrounding wiring for other cockpit equipment such as the stick shaker function or angle-of-attack indicators.

Certain Lindstrand Hot Air Balloons Ltd female ACME threaded hose connectors, part numbers HS6139 and HS6144, installed on balloons.

February 12, 2013, Final Rule.

The FAA is adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Lindstrand Hot Air Balloons Ltd female ACME threaded hose connectors, part numbers HS6139 and HS6144, installed on balloons. This AD results from mandatory continuing airworthiness information (MCAI) issued by an aviation authority of another country to identify and correct an unsafe condition on an aviation product. The MCAI describes the unsafe condition as insufficient tightness of the threaded hose connector in the assembly area that could result in fuel leakage. The FAA is issuing this AD to require actions to address the unsafe condition on these products.

All Pacific Aerospace Limited Models FU24-954 and FU24A-954 airplanes. 

February 12, 2013, Final Rule.

The FAA is superseding an existing airworthiness directive (AD) for all Pacific Aerospace Limited Models FU24-954 and FU24A-954 airplanes. This AD results from mandatory continuing airworthiness information (MCAI) issued by an aviation authority of another country to identify and correct an unsafe condition on an aviation product. The MCAI describes the unsafe condition as aircraft operating outside the aircraft aft center of gravity (C of G) limits during parachute-drop operations. Exceeding C of G limits could result in loss of control of the aircraft. The FAA is issuing this AD to require actions to address the unsafe condition on these products.

All Pilatus Aircraft Ltd. Models PC-12, PC-12/45, PC-12/47, and PC-12/47E airplanes. 

February 19, 2013, Final Rule.

The FAA is superseding an existing airworthiness directive (AD) for all Pilatus Aircraft Ltd. Models PC-12, PC-12/45, PC-12/47, and PC-12/47E airplanes. This AD results from mandatory continuing airworthiness information (MCAI) issued by an aviation authority of another country to identify and correct an unsafe condition on an aviation product. The MCAI describes the unsafe condition as a need to incorporate new revisions into the Limitations section, Chapter 4, of the FAA-approved maintenance program (e.g., maintenance manual). The FAA is issuing this AD to require actions to address the unsafe condition on these products.

Certain serial number Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. PW206B, PW206B2, PW206C, PW207C, PW207D, PW207D1, PW207D2, and PW207E turboshaft engines. 

February 19, 2013, Final Rule.

The FAA is adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain serial number Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. PW206B, PW206B2, PW206C, PW207C, PW207D, PW207D1, PW207D2, and PW207E turboshaft engines. This AD was prompted by the discovery that certain power turbine (PT) disks were made to specific heat codes that may not achieve the maximum in-service life. This AD requires re-identification of the PT disk to a part number (P/N) with a lower life limit. The FAA is issuing this AD to prevent possible uncontained PT disk failure and loss of helicopter control.

Certain Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. (P&WC) PT6C-67C turboshaft engines. 

February 19, 2013, Final Rule.

The FAA is adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. (P&WC) PT6C-67C turboshaft engines. This AD requires initial and repetitive borescope inspections to verify the presence of a retaining ring securing the power turbine (PT) baffle located near the second stage PT disk. If the engine fails the inspection, this AD also requires removing the engine from service before further flight. This AD was prompted by five reported incidents of second stage PT disk damage. The FAA is issuing this AD to prevent damage to the PT disk which, if undetected, could cause uncontained PT disk failure and loss of control of the helicopter.

All Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG (RRD) BR700-710A1-10 and BR700-710A2-20 turbofan engines, and certain BR700-710C4-11 model engines. 

February 14, 2013, Final Rule

The FAA is adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG (RRD) BR700-710A1-10 and BR700-710A2-20 turbofan engines, and certain BR700-710C4-11 model engines. This AD was prompted by RRD performing an evaluation that determined that certain high-pressure turbine (HPT) stage 1 and stage 2 discs from a specific supplier may contain steel inclusions that may cause the discs to fail before they reach their current life limits. This AD requires reducing the life limits for certain HPT stage 1 and stage 2 discs. The FAA is issuing this AD to prevent failure of the HPT stage 1 and stage 2 discs, which could result in uncontained failure of the engine and damage to the airplane.

The Schweizer Aircraft Corporation (Schweizer) Model 269D and Model 269D Configuration A helicopters.

February 12, 2013, Final Rule.

The FAA is adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for the Schweizer Aircraft Corporation (Schweizer) Model 269D and Model 269D Configuration A helicopters. The type certificate for these models is currently held by Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation (Sikorsky). This AD requires inspecting the aft fuselage assembly in the area around the attachment point of the horizontal stabilizer, including the paint, for a crack. This AD also requires inspecting the tailboom interior support structure, and if necessary, installing an inspection panel kit in the aft fuselage assembly, and installing doublers in the stabilizer support brackets. This AD is prompted by reports of loose horizontal stabilizers and cracks in the stabilizer support structure for the extruded tailboom. The actions are intended to prevent separation of the horizontal stabilizer from the helicopter and subsequent loss of control of the helicopter.