AVIATION (ASDI LIMITATIONS) / Federal Aviation Administration finalizes the process by which aircraft owners and operators may ask the FAA to limit the FAA’s dissemination of their aircraft data by means of the Aircraft Situation Display to Industry (ASDI) data feed to the airline industry.

“Access to Aircraft Situation Display to Industry (ASDI) and National Airspace System Status Information (NASSI) Data”

August 21, 2013. Final Notice Of The Process For Limiting Aircraft Data Displayed Via ASDI.

ASDI is a data feed hosted by U.S. DOT’s Volpe Center. This data feed is made available to airlines for purposes of safety. It includes information about aircraft location, together with data relating to altitude, airspeed, destination and various additional points.

Some aircraft owners have voice concern – to understate things – that parties might make use of such information about their aircraft and their activities which are not strictly related to aviation safety.

“In a proposal published on May 9, 2012, the FAA tentatively identified a process through which aircraft owners and operators could ask the FAA to limit the agency’s dissemination of their aircraft data via the FAA’s ASDI program.1 The FAA noted that its final decision on the policy will replace the interim policy to which the FAA has adhered since publishing it on December 16, 2011.2 After considering each of the comments submitted to the public docket in response to the proposal, the FAA is issuing this final policy with respect to the dissemination of aircraft data via ASDI.”

“… 

“’On November 18, 2011, the President signed into law H.R. 2112, the “Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2012,’ which provided the U.S. Department of Transportation’s appropriation for the balance of fiscal year 2012. Section 119A of that statute provided that:

‘[n]otwithstanding any other provision of law, none of the funds made available under this Act or any prior Act may be used to implement or to continue to implement any limitation on the ability of any owner or operator of a private aircraft to obtain, upon a request to the Administrator of the [FAA], a blocking of that owner’s or operator’s aircraft registration number from any display of the [FAA's ASDI and NASSI] data that is made available to the public, except data made available to a Government agency, for the noncommercial flights of that owner or operator.’ 

“In light of this appropriation language, the FAA withdrew a prior policy that it published on June 3, 2011, which required owners or operators to submit a Certified Security Concern in order to have their aircraft blocked from the public’s view on displays of ASDI and NASSI information. In connection with its withdrawal of the June 3 policy, the FAA published interim procedures by which the owners and operators of aircraft could request that the FAA block information about the operations of their aircraft from release to the public via the FAA’s ASDI data feed. At that time, the FAA noted that it would propose more detailed procedures for the ASDI blocking program and solicit public comment on the proposal. The FAA published the FAA’s proposed procedures on May 9, 2012. 

“The FAA now summarizes and evaluates the written comments submitted to the public docket in this matter and sets forth the FAA’s final decision on its policy related to the blocking of aircraft flight data from the ASDI data feed. In a separate action, the FAA will amend its memoranda of agreement with the subscribers who receive the information to clarify the subscriber responsibilities, consistent with the procedures described here.”