AVIATION (AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVE ON EMERGENCY LOCATOR TRANSMITTERS) / “[F]or certain Honeywell ASCa Inc. emergency locator transmitters (ELTs) installed on various transport category airplanes. … [R]equires various one-time general visual inspections of the ELT transmitter units (TUs), and corrective actions if necessary.… [P]rompted by a fire on a parked and unoccupied airplane; preliminary information indicated combustion in the area of the ELT TU.”

“Airworthiness Directives; Honeywell ASCa Inc. Emergency Locator Transmitters Installed on Various Transport Category Airplanes”

Final Rule; Request for Comments. September 18, 2013.

This has received a certain amount of attention in the industry press.

“Following an event where a fire broke out on a parked and unoccupied aeroplane, the United Kingdom Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB) carried out an investigation to determine the cause of the fire. Although the investigation is still ongoing, preliminary information indicated that there was combustion in the area of the ELT TU. Subsequent to the fire event, inspection of in-service ELT TUs revealed battery wiring installation discrepancies inside the TU that may result in an electrical short. The AAIB noted that in case of an electrical short, the ELT battery could provide the energy for an ignition.” 

AVIATION / FAA “Airworthiness Directives” to correct “unsafe conditions” in aircraft and engines – Airbus airplanes, BAE Systems airplanes, The Boeing Company airplanes, Bombardier airplanes, Cessna Aircraft airplanes, Costruzioni Aeronautiche Tecnausri engines, Diamond airplanes, Eurocopter France helicopters, Pilatus airplanes, Slingsby Sailplanes sailplanes, and Turbomeca, S.A. engines.

The FAA has issued various final or proposed “airworthiness directives” (“AD’s”) for specified models of aircraft and engines. 

Who is affected? Any party who operates or holds a property interest (owner, lessee, or security party) in the specified aircraft or engines.

What is an AD? Per 14 CFR § 39.1 the FAA issues an AD where: (a) “An unsafe condition exists in a product [aircraft, engine, propeller, or appliance]; and (b) “that condition is likely to exist or develop in other products of the same type design”. “No person may operate a product to which an [AD] applies except in accordance with the requirements of that [AD].” 14 CFR § 39.3. 

All Airbus Model A330-200 Freighter, -200, and -300 series airplanes; and Model A340-200, -300, -500, and -600 series airplanes.  Continue reading

AVIATION / FAA “Airworthiness Directives” to correct “unsafe conditions” in aircraft and engines – Airbus airplanes, Boeing airplanes, and Gulfstream airplanes.

The FAA has issued various final or proposed “airworthiness directives” (“AD’s”) for specified models of aircraft and engines. 

Who is affected? Any party who operates or holds a property interest (owner, lessee, or security party) in the specified aircraft or engines.

What is an AD? Per 14 CFR § 39.1 the FAA issues an AD where: (a) “An unsafe condition exists in a product [aircraft, engine, propeller, or appliance]; and (b) “that condition is likely to exist or develop in other products of the same type design”. “No person may operate a product to which an [AD] applies except in accordance with the requirements of that [AD].” 14 CFR § 39.3. 

Certain Airbus Model A318-112, A319-111, A319-112, A319-115, A319-132, and A319-133 airplanes.  Continue reading

AVIATION / FAA “Airworthiness Directives” to correct “unsafe conditions” in aircraft and engines – Agusta S.p.A. helicopters, Agusta S.p.A. and Bell Helicopter Textron helicopters, The Boeing Company airplanes, Embraer S.A. airplanes, Reims Aviation S.A. airplanes, Robinson Helicopter Company helicopters, Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan engines, and Rolls-Royce (1971) Limited, Bristol Engine Division Turbojet engines.

The FAA has issued various final or proposed “airworthiness directives” (“AD’s”) for specified models of aircraft and engines. 

Who is affected? Any party who operates or holds a property interest (owner, lessee, or security party) in the specified aircraft or engines.

What is an AD? Per 14 CFR § 39.1 the FAA issues an AD where: (a) “An unsafe condition exists in a product [aircraft, engine, propeller, or appliance]; and (b) “that condition is likely to exist or develop in other products of the same type design”. “No person may operate a product to which an [AD] applies except in accordance with the requirements of that [AD].” 14 CFR § 39.3. 

Agusta S.p.A. (Agusta) Model AB412 and AB412 EP, and Bell Helicopter Textron (Bell) Model 412, 412CF, and 412EP helicopters with certain DART Aerospace Ltd. (Dart) high gear aft crosstubes (crosstube) installed. 

February 25, 2013, Notice of Proposed Rulemaking. Continue reading

AVIATION / FAA “Airworthiness Directives” to correct “unsafe conditions” in aircraft and engines – Airbus airplanes, Bell helicopters, Boeing airplanes, Bombardier airplanes, Cessna Aircraft airplanes, DASSAULT SERVICES airplanes, DG Flugzeugbau GmbH engines, Embraer, S.A. airplanes, Eurocopter France helicopters, Gulfstream Aerospace airplanes, Hawker Beechcraft Corporation airplanes, Lindstrand Hot Air Balloons, Pacific Aerospace airplanes, Pilatus airplanes, Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. engines, Rolls-Royce Deutschland engines, and Schweizer Aircraft Corporation airplanes.

The FAA has issued various final or proposed “airworthiness directives” (“AD’s”) for specified models of aircraft and engines. 

Who is affected? Any party who operates or holds a property interest (owner, lessee, or security party) in the specified aircraft or engines.

What is an AD? Per 14 CFR § 39.1 the FAA issues an AD where: (a) “An unsafe condition exists in a product [aircraft, engine, propeller, or appliance]; and (b) “that condition is likely to exist or develop in other products of the same type design”. “No person may operate a product to which an [AD] applies except in accordance with the requirements of that [AD].” 14 CFR § 39.3. 

Certain Airbus Model A300 B4-600, B4-600R, and F4-600R series airplanes, and Model A300 C4-605R Variant F airplanes (collectively called A300-600 series airplanes); and Model A310 series airplanes. 

February 12, 2013, Final Rule.  Continue reading

AVIATION / FAA “Airworthiness Directives” to correct “unsafe conditions” in aircraft and engines – Airbus airplanes, Bell helicopters, Boeing airplanes, Cessna airplanes, DASSAULT SERVICES airplanes, Dowty propellers, Engine Alliance turbofan engines, Eurocopter France helicopters, Fokker Services B.V. airplanes, Hamilton Sunstrand propellers, MD helicopters, Piper airplanes, and Turbomeca turboshaft engines.

The FAA has issued various final or proposed “airworthiness directives” (“AD’s”) for specified models of aircraft and engines. 

Who is affected? Any party who operates or holds a property interest (owner, lessee, or security party) in the specified aircraft or engines.

What is an AD? Per 14 CFR § 39.1 the FAA issues an AD where: (a) “An unsafe condition exists in a product [aircraft, engine, propeller, or appliance]; and (b) “that condition is likely to exist or develop in other products of the same type design”. “No person may operate a product to which an [AD] applies except in accordance with the requirements of that [AD].” 14 CFR § 39.3.

Certain Airbus Model A310 series airplanes.

February 5, 2013, Notice Of Proposed Rulemaking.  Continue reading

AVIATION / FAA “Airworthiness Directives” to correct “unsafe conditions” in aircraft and engines – Airbus airplanes, BAE Systems airplanes, Bell helicopters, Boeing airplanes, Bombardier, Inc. airplanes, EADS CASA airplanes, Eurocopter helicopters, Piper Aircraft, Inc. airplanes, Rolls-Royce plc Turbofan engines, and Turbomeca S.A. Turboshaft engines.

The FAA has issued various final or proposed “airworthiness directives” (“AD’s”) for specified models of aircraft and engines. 

Who is affected? Any party who operates or holds a property interest (owner, lessee, or security party) in the specified aircraft or engines.

What is an AD? Per 14 CFR § 39.1 the FAA issues an AD where: (a) “An unsafe condition exists in a product [aircraft, engine, propeller, or appliance]; and (b) “that condition is likely to exist or develop in other products of the same type design”. “No person may operate a product to which an [AD] applies except in accordance with the requirements of that [AD].” 14 CFR § 39.3.

All Airbus Model A330-200 Freighter series airplanes; Model A330-200 and -300 series airplanes; and Model A340-200 and -300 series airplanes.  Continue reading

AVIATION / FAA “Airworthiness Directives” to correct “unsafe conditions” in aircraft and engines – Bell helicopters, CFM International engines, Engine Alliance engines, and Rolls-Royce engines.

The FAA has issued various final or proposed “airworthiness directives” (“AD’s”) for specified models of aircraft and engines. 

Who is affected? Any party who operates or holds a property interest (owner, lessee, or security party) in the specified aircraft or engines.

What is an AD? Per 14 CFR § 39.1 the FAA issues an AD where: (a) “An unsafe condition exists in a product [aircraft, engine, propeller, or appliance]; and (b) “that condition is likely to exist or develop in other products of the same type design”. “No person may operate a product to which an [AD] applies except in accordance with the requirements of that [AD].” 14 CFR § 39.3.

CFM International, S.A. CFM56-3, CFM56-3B, and CFM56-3C turbofan engines. Continue reading

AVIATION / Deadline for Airworthiness Directive 2012-11-09 to restore supplemental oxygen to lavatories on specified aircraft.

This action adds termination criteria and an expiration date to Special Federal Aviation Regulation 111, which temporarily authorizes variances from existing standards related to the provisioning of supplemental oxygen inside lavatories. 

January 28, 2013, Final ruleContinue reading